State panel approves intermodal despite concerns

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Residents fear the area will be overrun with road freight traffic. Image source: Liverpool Leader

Residents fear the area will be overrun with road freight traffic.
Image source: Liverpool Leader

THE proposed Sydney Intermodal Terminal Alliance freight terminal at Moorebank has been given concept approval by the state government’s Planning and Assessment Commission (PAC).

Liverpool Leader reported that the Planning Assessment Commission acknowledged there were significant traffic, air and noise concerns with the proposal from private consortium SIMTA when it handed down its decision.

The panel approved the concept despite residents rallying in objection at its meeting recently. Image source: Liverpool Leader

The panel approved the concept despite residents rallying in objection at its meeting recently.
Image source: Liverpool Leader

The commission also said it was “disappointed” a masterplan for the site was never carried out.

“This is the wrong location and will have long-ranging consequences if this goes ahead,” Liverpool Mayor Ned Mannoun said.

“The PAC report is not the green light for development … SIMTA can’t build or dig, and there is an immense amount of work to do to address the raft of issues outlined by the PAC.

“The report highlighted what we have been saying all along about the lack of planning.”

He said the panel recognised intersections on Moorebank Ave and the Hume Highway would need major upgrades.

Cr Mannoun has vowed to keep up the fight against the intermodal. Image source: Liverpool Leader

Cr Mannoun has vowed to keep up the fight against the intermodal.
Image source: Liverpool Leader

SIMTA welcomed news of the approval but still needs state development approval before it can build and said it would consult the community further.

“The next step will be to lodge a State significant development application with the NSW Department of Planning and Environment for the first stage,” senior manager of SIMTA partner Qube Holdings, Michael Yiend said.

“This process will again involve a public exhibition period.”